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A Camera As Big As A Molecule Was Created To See The Impossible

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The scientists at Cambridge University did something that seemed impossible before: to observe chemical reactions in real time through the creation of a “camera” as large as a molecule. The study was published in Nature Nanotechnology.

The device in question was assembled using gold nanoparticles and semiconductor nanocrystals called “quantum points,” joined together by a molecular “glue.” How does it work? The camera uses a photosynthesis-like process to reveal exactly what is happening between the molecules during a reaction.

Thanks to the invention of experts, it will be much easier to monitor the formation of various chemical compounds during reactions than the methods currently available to scientists. The team at Cambridge University has already said that they are already using the camera to improve the technology behind solar cells.

“We were surprised how powerful this new instrument is, considering how simple it is to assemble,” said the first author of Cambridge’s study and chemist Kamil Sokolowski in a press release. In short, a great discovery (and invention) that will be very useful for future research.

By the way: in recent years, experts have managed to create a microscope that can do magnetic resonance imaging to cells. I mean, you’re really amazing.

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