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An Astronaut Tries To Describe What Happens When You Return To Earth

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Space is definitely a magical, wonderful and borderless place. The return to Earth, however, is much less wonderful and much more rocambolisco. So recently retired astronaut Jack Fischer spoke on Twitter about his view of returning to our planet.

“I took a ride back to Earth, courtesy of Soyuz, four years ago. Some astronauts compare the journey to a series of car accidents… and I wouldn’t agree,” the astronaut on Twitter wrote on September 3, along with a video that portrays it together with astronaut Peggy.

A spacecraft returning to our planet experiences several “brusche braking”. The first is with contact in our atmosphere, the second is when parachutes are opened to slow down even more and the third is when small rocket engines are activated. The landing of the Soyuz is often described as “not soft” and comes from here the analogy with the automobile accident.

In his tweet series, Fischer also showed what you see from the small porthole of the spacecraft during landing (you will find all the videos mentioned below). Air friction creates a plasma bubble around the aircraft, interrupting communications with ground control stations for about three minutes.

In short, definitely a truly spectacular and incredible experience.

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